Is feminism intersectional?

“My feminism will be intersectional or it will be bullshit,” Flavia Dzodan wrote in an essay pointing out that white feminism can fall into a terrible tendency of being à la carte — that “feminists” will champion equality as it suits them, and ignore things like racial inequality or LGBT discrimination. Dzodan’s words dovetail with a major criticism of feminism today — that white women who call themselves feminists tend to pay attention only to issues that pertain to them.

This idea came to life in the Meryl Streep T-shirt controversy. The fact that Streep didn’t seem to recognize how her shirt could be interpreted is, to some people, confirmation that feminism still isn’t intersectional.”

From Vox’s, “Meryl Streep’s ‘slave’ t-shirt outrage explained”.

Advertisements

Quick Review: Islamic Law

Islamic law is known as the law of God or the Shari’a. Classically, Islam draws no distinction between religious and secular life. Hence, Shari’a covers not only religious rituals, but also many aspects of day-to-day life, politics, economics, banking, business or contract law, and social issues. The term Shari’a itself, derives from the verb Shara’a, which connects to the idea of spiritual law and the system of divine law. Sharia has certain laws that are regarded as divinely ordained, concrete, and timeless for all relevant situations (i.e. the ban against drinking liquor as an intoxicant).

Shari’a is based on four primary sources: 1) the Quran, 2) the hadith, or tradition, 3) ijma’, or consensus of jurists, and 4) ‘aql, or reasoning (Entessar 1988, 94). The Quran is the foundational source of law for all Shari’a, however, Shi’a Shari’a also places a great deal of weight on the considerations and views of the Imams in the formation of its legal system (Entessar 1988, 94).

Hadith refers to the statements, deeds, and sayings of the Prophet and the Imams recorded and codified by their companions (Entessar 1988, 94). Both ijma’ and ‘aql are considered by some as secondary sources of Shi’a law, with the former delineating the views of the Shi’a scholars who were close companions of the Imams and the latter describing judgments based on pure and practical reason from which religious law can be inferred (Entessar 1988, 94).

Certain laws are extracted based on principles established by Islamic lawyers and judges (Mujtahed; pl. Mujtahedun). In deriving Shari’a law, Islamic lawmakers attempt to interpret divine principles. An Islamic lawyer or judge’s attempt to rule according to Islam law can be described as ruling by Shari’a, it can concurrently be heavily influenced by local customers (urf).

Islamic jurisprudence is called figh (meaning understanding of details) and refers to the interferences about Islamic rules drawn by scholars from the principles divined from Shari’a. Figh is divided into two parts: the study of the sources and methodology (usul figh; roots of the law) and the practical rules (furu figh; branches of the law). Legal scholars hope that Shari’a and figh are in harmony any given cases, but cannot be sure.

The Iranian penal code upholds the four major crime categories of Islamic law: hudud, qisas, ta’zir, and diyat. Hudud crimes include theft, robbery, adultery, drinking alcohol, and rebellion. Punishments for hudud crimes are enumerated in the Quran, which range from stoning to bodily mutilations to executions.

Qisas crimes include murder, manslaughter, and mutilation. These offenses are regarded as acts against the victim. It left to the discretion of the victim’s family if retributive injury should be inflicted on the perpetrator that is exactly equal to that inflicted on the victim (Entessar 1988, 98). Despite the legalization of retribution and vendettas, the Quran and Iranian penal code recommend forgiveness as it is pleasing to God (Entessar 1988, 98).

Ta’zir crimes are not otherwise specified in the Quran or hadith. Punishments for these crimes range from fines to seizure of property and public flogging. The judge is burdened with determining an appropriate punishment considering the temporal culture and public interest (Entessar 1988, 98).

Diyat, or blood money, delineates a form of compensation (i.e. reparation) rather than a category of punishment. In lieu of qisas (retribution), the victim’s family may elect to seek reparations from the perpetrator. The Iranian penal code has codified diyat allocations for numerous crimes (Entessar 1988, 98).

This brief introduction was written by myself and a colleague, Mehrnoosh Karimi Andu.

Published in the following book chapter:

Tavassolian, Nargess, Mohamad Hedayati-Kakhki, Kamiar Alaei and Alexandra Harrington. “Interrogating Suspects in Iran”. In Walsh, D., Oxburgh, G. E., Redlich, A. D., & Myklebust, T. (2015). International Developments and Practices in Investigative Interviewing and Interrogation: Volume 2: Suspects. Routledge.

#MoneyQuote

…on why drone strikes don’t work for US national security and counter-terrorism efforts in the long run.

“Because this president, in my opinion, has fundamentally undermined our ability to defend this nation by killing terrorists rather than capturing them and taking them to an intelligence facility like Guantanamo Bay and learning how these groups operate,” Lippold added. “And while the program appears on the face to have had great success, I think ultimately the drone program is setting us up for failure because for each high-level terrorist you kill, that is a high-level intelligence asset that is no longer available to exploit.”

This quote is taken from this Daily Caller article.

Hands for Ahar mourns the 37 dead and hundreds injured in Bushehr

Hands for Ahar

On Tuesday, a 6.3-magnitude (or, according to other reports, a 6.1) earthquake struck the village of Kaki in the southwestern region of Iran called Bushehr, which is also the location of the country’s only nuclear power plant, injuring over 800 and killing 37 others.

Bushehr, Iran

Several aftershocks have been felt, the highest marking at a 5.3 magnitude. The power plant is reportedly unaffected by the earthquake, as the government – and the Russian organization that built the plant – released formal statements testifying that there had been no release or spills of nuclear material.

As rescue efforts wane, aid agencies are seeking to provide food and shelter to those affected. The Iranian Red Crescent, the primary agency by which aid was administered to those struck by the earthquake in the northwestern region of Iran last summer, is currently heading aid efforts. There is no word as of yet if…

View original post 102 more words

War with Iran is not the answer.

Not again.

There’s a resolution on the Senate floor (Senate Resolution (SR) 65) that would pledge American support to Israel in the case of an attack on Iran. Not only would this be detrimental to the moving-at-the-speed-of-molasses international talks with Iran, but, more importantly, the United States cannot afford to expand the Global War on Terror (GWOT) and another Iraq.

Feel strongly about this?

Check out the Friends Committee on National Legislation (FCNL), who very cleverly named their advocacy initiative “Don’t ‘Iraq’ Iran”.

The National Iranian-American Council (NIAC) also provides some talking points to bring up to your Senator.

Other sides of Iran.

I stumbled upon this recent Atlantic article, and in a frenzy of clicks here and tangents there, I’ve decided to compile a list of interesting websites, articles, blogs, etc. that have photos from Iran.

Check out pictures of everyday life in Iran. And these too.

A friend of mine, who studied at the Corcoran, frequents Iran and has pictures of it peppered throughout her professional photography website and Facebook.

Humans of New York went to Iran, and this is what he saw.

Here is some shameless self-promotion.

Finally, do you have any pictures of Iran you want me to link on this post? Comment or email me, and I’d be happy to include them!